Year-End Tax Planning for Business

While the fate of several business-related tax extenders such as Research & Development tax credits, bonus depreciation, and Section 179 expensing that expired at the end of 2014 is uncertain, there are still a number of end of year tax planning strategies businesses can use to reduce their tax burden for 2015.

Deferring Income
Businesses using the cash method of accounting can defer income into 2016 by delaying end-of-year invoices so payment is not received until 2016. Businesses using the accrual method can defer income by postponing delivery of goods or services until January 2016.

Section 179 Expensing.
Business should still take advantage of Section 179 expensing this year for a couple of reasons.  In 2015 businesses can elect to expense (deduct immediately) the entire cost of most new equipment up to a maximum of $25,000 for the first $200,000 of property placed in service by December 31, 2015. Keep in mind that the Section 179 deduction cannot exceed net taxable business income. In addition, unless Congress reauthorizes it, the bonus depreciation expired at the end of 2014 and is not available for 2015.

While most businesses follow a calendar year, for those that don’t there is an exception to the $25,000 cap that allows those businesses to take advantage of the $500,000 Section 179 benefit. However, only businesses whose calendar year begins in 2014 and ends in 2015 can take advantage of this.

Qualified property is defined as property that you placed in service during the tax year and used predominantly (more than 50 percent) in your trade or business. Property that is placed in service and then disposed of in that same tax year does not qualify, nor does property converted to personal use in the same tax year it is acquired.

Note-blue-stickyNote: Many states have not matched these amounts and, therefore, state tax may not allow for the maximum federal deduction. In this case, two sets of depreciation records will be needed to track the federal and state tax impact.

 

Small Business Health Care Tax Credit.
Small business employers with 25 or fewer full-time-equivalent employees (average annual wages of $51,600 in 2015) may qualify for a tax credit to help pay for employees’ health insurance. The credit is 50 percent (35 percent for non-profits).

Business Energy Investment Tax Credit.
Business energy investment tax credits are still available for eligible systems placed in service on or before December 31, 2016, and businesses that want to take advantage of these tax credits can still do so.

Business energy credits include solar energy systems (passive solar and solar pool-heating systems excluded), fuel cells and microturbines, and an increased credit amount for fuel cells. The extended tax provision also established new credits for small wind-energy systems, geothermal heat pumps, and combined heat and power (CHP) systems. Utilities are allowed to use the credits as well.

Repair Regulations.
Where possible, end of year repairs and expenses should be deducted immediately, rather than capitalized and depreciated. Small businesses lacking applicable financial statements (AFS) are able to take advantage of de minimis safe harbor by electing to deduct smaller purchases ($500 or less per purchase or per invoice). Businesses with applicable financial statements are able to deduct $5,000. Small business with gross receipts of $10 million or less can also take advantage of safe harbor for repairs, maintenance, and improvements to eligible buildings. Please call if you would like more information on this topic.

Section 199 Deduction.
Businesses with manufacturing activities could qualify for a Section 199 domestic production activities deduction. By accelerating salaries or bonuses attributable to domestic production gross receipts in the last quarter of 2015, businesses can increase the amount of this deduction.

Small Business Investment Company Program

There are a variety of alternatives to bank financing for small businesses, especially business start-ups. The Small Business Investment Company Program fills the gap between the availability of venture capital and the needs of small businesses that are either starting or growing. Licensed and regulated by the SBA, SBICs are privately owned and managed investment firms that make capital available to small businesses through investments or loans. They use their own funds plus funds obtained at favorable rates with SBA guaranties and/or by selling their preferred stock to the SBA.

SBICs are for-profit firms whose incentive is to share in the success of a small business. Laptop on Desk office and Graph analysis spreadsheet, Business financeIn addition to equity capital and long-term loans, SBICs provide debt-equity investments and management assistance.

The SBIC Program provides funding to all types of manufacturing and service industries. Some investment companies specialize in certain fields, while others seek out small businesses with new products or services because of the strong growth potential. Most, however, consider a wide variety of investment opportunities.

Surety Bond Programs
By law, prime contractors to the federal government must post surety bonds on federal construction projects valued at $100,000 or more. Many state, county, city and private-sector projects require bonding as well. The SBA can guarantee bid, performance and payment bonds for contracts up to $1.25 million for small businesses that cannot obtain bonds through regular commercial channels.

Bonds may be obtained in two ways:
Prior Approval. Contractors apply through a surety bonding agent. The guaranty goes to the surety.

Preferred Sureties. Preferred sureties are authorized by the SBA to issue, monitor and service bonds without prior SBA approval.

The SBA has offices located throughout the United States. For the one nearest you, look under “U.S. Government” in your telephone directory, or call the SBA Answer Desk at (800) 827-5722. To send a fax to the SBA, dial (202) 205-7064. For the hearing impaired, the TDD number is (704) 344-6640.

How Can I Avoid Running Into Cash Flow Problems in My Small Business?

A wise business owner once said, “Happiness is a positive cash flow.” As a business owner, I’m sure you agree. Everything is better when your cash-in exceeds your cash-out. A cash crisis can be emotionally devastating and it can even kill your business. If you’ve ever had to beg, borrow and steal to cover tomorrows payroll you know what I mean.

Failure to properly plan cash flow is one of the leading causes for small business failures.Cash Flow Experience has shown that many small business owners lack an understanding of basic accounting principles. Knowing the basics will help you better manage your cash flow.

A business’s monetary supply can exist either as cash on hand or in a business checking account available to meet expenses. A sufficient cash flow covers your business by meeting obligations (i.e., paying bills), serving as a cushion in case of emergencies, and providing investment capital.

The Operating Cycle

The operating cycle is the system through which cash flows, from the purchase of inventory through the collection of accounts receivable. It measures the flow of assets into cash. For example, your operating cycle may begin with both cash and inventory on hand. Typically, additional inventory is purchased on account to guarantee that you will not deplete your stock as sales are made. Your sales will consist of cash sales and accounts receivable – credit sales. Accounts receivable are usually paid 30 days after the original purchase date. This applies to both the inventory you purchase and the products you sell. When you make payment for inventory, both cash and accounts payable are reduced. Thirty days after the sale of your inventory, receivables are usually collected, which increases your cash. Now your cash has completed its flow through the operating cycle and is ready to begin again

Cash-flow analysis should show whether your daily operations generate enough cash to meet your obligations, and how major outflows of cash to pay your obligations relate to major inflows of cash from sales. As a result, you can tell if inflows and outflows from your operation combine to result in a positive cash flow or in a net drain. Any significant changes over time will also appear.

A monthly cash-flow projection helps to identify and eliminate deficiencies or surpluses in cash and to compare actual figures to past months. When cash-flow deficiencies are found, business financial plans must be altered to provide more cash. When excess cash is revealed, it might indicate excessive borrowing or idle money that could be invested. The objective is to develop a plan that will provide a well-balanced cash flow.

Using ComputerEase tools such as the WIP Report and the Cash Center creates a real time picture of your cash flow. But did you also know that you can create a What-If Scenario within the Cash Center? Using this feature gives you the flexibility to predict your cash flow based on the fields of your choice.  If you have any questions on this or any of the other features provided by ComputerEase, please contact us by Clicking Here.

Business Strategies

Financing

One key to successful business expansion is your ability to obtain and secure appropriate financing. But as many quickly discover, raising capital may not be easy; in fact, it can be a complex and frustrating process.

However, if you are informed and have planned effectively, raising money for your business will not be a painful experience. Professional guidance should be considered in this quest, especially as to the financial information for the loan proposal.

 Finding Sources of Money

There are several sources to consider when looking for financing. It is important to explore all of your options before making a decision. These include:

Banks and Credit Unions. The most common source of funding, banks and credit unions, will provide a loan if you can show that your business proposal is sound.

Venture Capital Firms. These firms help expanding companies grow in exchange for equity or partial ownership.

Borrowing Money

Requesting a loan when you are not properly prepared sends a signal to your lender. That message is: “High Risk!” To be successful in obtaining a loan, you must be prepared and organized. You must know exactly how much money you need, why you need it, and how you will pay it back. You must be able to convince your lender that you are a good credit risk.

Terms of loans may vary from lender to lender, but there are two basic types of loans: short-term and long-term.

A short-term loan generally has a maturity date of one year. These include working-capital loans, accounts-receivable loans and lines of credit.

Long-term loans generally mature between one and seven years. Real estate and equipment loans are also considered long-term loans, but may have a maturity date of up to 25 years. Long-term loans are used for major business expenses such as purchasing real estate and facilities, construction, durable equipment, furniture and fixtures, vehicles, etc.

WIP or Get Whipped

Why accurate, timely Work In Progress reporting is essential to contractors

By John Meibers, President of ComputerEase Software

Too many times a contractor creates a Work in Progress – (WIP) report because he feels he is obligated to do so, as the bonding agent or the bank requires it.  However, an accurate and timely WIP report should be seen as one of the essential tools for running a business.  A WIP report is a key component of enabling you to look into the future through forecasted projections.  So why are forecasted projections important? They enable you to be proactive with job data as opposed to reactive.  For Example, armed with the information that I have a job that is 50% completed at a cost of 75% of the budget, I still have time to make adjustments in an effort to reduce some of my potential cost overrun.

Reports ImageHow is an accurate and timely WIP report accomplished?  A successful company starts with clear communication between their accounting and project managers. The role of the accountant is to question potential inconsistencies in the report, whereas the project manager needs real-time, accurate data from the field. With that information, the company can make smarter decisions in deploying their resources in order to maximizing their profits. Ultimately if a company is not making money, everything else becomes irrelevant.

The importance of WIP reports in analyzing your business cannot be emphasized enough. Too often I have observed business owners utilizing a CPA as a bookkeeper, entering numbers and producing reports, instead of acting upon the numbers.  Conversely, companies that gather solid WIP reports add value by maximizing their CPA’s expertise as a business consultant as they strive to grow their bottom-line profits. WIP reports not only enable you to manage your jobs accurately, they are a key component in creating an accurate financial statement, which is required when analyzing of your company’s stability and growth.

I am often asked the question: “How often should I run a WIP Report”?  Some people only run a WIP report when they need too, others will run the report monthly or even weekly.    The frequency of your WIP reporting will be based on the specific parameters of your unique business. The bottom-line: the sooner you receive that information the sooner you will have visibility of the projected problems. Only then will you have an opportunity to fix the problems.

Another question I am often asked is: “How do I go about calculating a WIP report”? There are a number of methods one can use to calculate WIP. The three most common used methods are Units Completed, Percent Completed, and Cost to Finish.

In my years of experience working with project managers in construction companies I have learned that units completed in conjunction with the percent of budget spent, is the most accurate method of costing. For example, I have 100 standard light fixtures to install; I have installed 50 of them, therefore the task is 50% completed. Everything sounds good so far. However, if I have spent 80% of the budget on the installation of those 50 light fixtures then, “Houston, we have a problem”. This clearly demonstrates why analyzing only the estimated costs as opposed to the actual costs can prevent a company from seeing that a particular job is losing money.

The second method utilized to calculate WIP is the percent completed; it is used when I don’t have a measurable unit.  For example, perhaps I am doing the electrical work in a facility. As the PM, I walk the project with my superintendent so that I can give an estimate of the completion. A “units completed” would be more accurate, but the “my educated guess says we are 50% done” method is still going to be better than saying “I don’t know”. One of the worst assumptions that can be made is estimating the completion of a job based on how much money I have spent thus far.

Another very good method to calculate your WIP is Cost to Finish.  I ask my project manager: “What do I need to finish this task”? I already know how much we have spent to date. But to finish the task I am going to need 10 men for the next two weeks and I have $5,000 in miscellaneous materials that have yet to be ordered. With this information I can then calculate a cost to finish. The equation would be my cost to date plus my cost to finish which then becomes my revised estimate.

Any of these three methods work and all of them are better than just comparing the estimated cost to the actual cost. If you look at a $100,000 budgeted job and you can see that $50,000 has been spent thus far, the absolute worst assumption you can make would be that 50% of the job is completed. The odds are against you that you will spend exactly $100,000 on that specific job. The reality of contractors completing a job for exactly within budget, just never happens.

The question that then follows is: “Just how detailed do I need to be in my WIP report”? I will certainly want a companywide overview WIP report, but I will also want a job-by-job WIP report, and within the job I want to see the details of the specified activities or tasks. This in turn leads to the question: “How detailed do I need to be on tracking activities or tasks?” (the costs of which will feed into the WIP report).  Some companies track one task, others up to 100, and yet others track more than 100 tasks to complete a job. Optimally you need as many details as possible. You may have 100 task codes, but if it’s not probable that your field staff will ever break down the costs to the 100 activities, there is no point in having 100 activities. The result will be some activities that are way over budget and others that are way under budget because no-one is allocating their costs properly. There is certainly a fine line between “ I would like to have a lot of detail” and  “what is a realistic outcome when I gather the data in the field?”.

Contractors often start out as a smaller business with the owner walking around knowing everything about every job and its progress. He has his finger on the pulse of the business. However, the larger the company grows, the more visibility tends to become obscured. No one wants to do twice as much work to make the same amount of money. When a process is put in place, everyone knows the jobs that make money and the ones that lose money. Real time, accurate job costing is similar to keeping score in a game. If the PM knows the score then he/she can make better decisions about the next play.

Real-Time Labor Costs Improve Your Bottom Line

Real Time ReportingAny contractor knows that successful project management hinges on labor. That’s not to say that smart material purchases and inventory control don’t also play a role in job profitability. However, unproductive labor will always kill profit, which is why knowing your real-time labor costs can improve your bottom line.

Traditionally, labor costs have been notoriously difficult to track because of the time lapse between what was happening in the field versus what your office records reflected. It wasn’t that long ago when, if a project manager wanted to know the job progress, he had to look at the last payroll processed – which could be a week old or more. While this was good information for the time, it certainly wasn’t accurate.

Thankfully, technology has revolutionized how contractors manage labor – and the overall job. Today, project managers can get real-time labor costs that tie into their construction accounting software, like ComputerEase.

In the construction industry – where customer expectations are high, profit margins are slim and the pace is faster than ever – you need labor costs on a daily basis to make informed decisions. Today, you don’t have to wait until the paperwork is turned in; you have technology to help you.

Field-to-OfficeTimesheets, daily logs, change orders and job costs can all be captured from the field so you know what’s happening at all times. Mobile devices with internet access can transmit data from the field directly to your accounting system in the home office, eliminating the double-entry problem.

When a real-time field-to-office solution is set up, you can manage a job from anywhere. Imagine a workplace where your crew is out in the field during the day, and by night you know who worked on what job, what tasks they performed and even what equipment was used. It really is that simple when you have the right system in place.

Learn more about our real-time solution, FieldEase.

Three Factors That Can Determine Whether Your Equipment is Helping You Profit

Equipment Should ContributeDo you question whether the equipment in your construction fleet is profitable or if you should be renting equipment as needed instead? Do you have a piece of equipment that often sits idle for months and don’t know whether to sell it or hold onto it – just in case?

You aren’t alone. Many contractors ask the same questions. To find the answer for your construction company, you need to know the three factors that determine profitability of construction equipment.

 

1. Equipment Costs

Two categories make up your equipment costs – cost to own and cost to operate. Cost to own is composed of fixed costs – whether you operate the equipment or it sits idle in your warehouse. These expenses are insurance and depreciation.

Cost to operate are variable costs associated with actual operation, such as maintenance, repairs and fuel.

 

2. Equipment Revenue

Revenue from your equipment is generated when you charge an internal rental rate to your jobs. To establish this rate, you need to know the costs to own and operate the equipment (as mentioned above) and the going rate within current market conditions.

Setting an internal equipment rental rate is similar to bidding a construction job. For example, if your costs indicate that your backhoe rental rate is $200 per day, you don’t want to set a higher internal rental rate just to show a profit on the backhoe.

Conversely, if your equipment costs exceed the going market rate, you’ll need to figure out why and decide if continuing to own the equipment is good for your bottom line.

 

3. Equipment Utilization

Equipment Not in UseAnother factor in determining your equipment profitability is how often you use the equipment. To evaluate this properly, have a clear understanding of both annual usage and lifetime usage for each piece of equipment. For example, say you’ve determined that your backhoe needs to be in use 50 hours annually to break even. In the first year, it is used 120 hours, which makes it profitable. In the second year, it is only used 20 hours. Does that mean it’s not worth holding onto it? Maybe, but you need to look deeper than that.

When you only analyze one year at a time, your conclusion will keep changing. But when you look at the equipment over many years, the law of averages provides a more realistic picture. Historical data is vital to making important decisions regarding the profitability of your fleet.

 

Now that you know the determining factors, let’s look at three options for tracking equipment usage and gauging profitability.

A spreadsheet is one way to track your equipment usage. Many CFMs are experts in designing complex formulas to compute data and to help them analyze the results. While using a spreadsheet isn’t a bad option, it does require you to manually input data, and there are man-hours associated with keeping the spreadsheet up to date. Often, construction firms do this on a weekly or even monthly basis, which means real-time data are never available.

Another option for tracking your equipment is using your accounting program’s job cost functionality. Every accounting program on the market has a different level of complexity, so the process of setting it up to track and manage your equipment can vary (detailed set-up instructions can be found here). While this option does allow you to collect equipment utilization data in a central location, manual input is still necessary.

Paper ClutterThe best option is to use equipment management software that is a component of your construction accounting program. With this approach, you have a variety of built-in tools for managing all aspects of your equipment as soon as a piece of equipment is set up within the system. These tools include preventative maintenance alerts and work orders for maintenance and repairs.

An integrated equipment module also automates a number of tasks to greatly reduce the number of man-hours and human-error factor. Tasks such as assigning equipment to jobs and generating recurrent billings can all be automated. Not only does this improve efficiency, but it also give you a more accurate snapshot of your job costs to-date.

Once you begin to track equipment costs in this fashion, you can easily identify which pieces of your fleet are profitable and which ones aren’t. Discover how the ComputerEase Equipment Management module can provide you with the historical data you need to make your construction equipment profitable.

Common Errors in Converting to New Construction Accounting Software

Napkin Floor PlanA great writer once said, “Beginnings are always messy,” and this is often true in the construction industry. Some of our most trying events happen at the beginning of a new project, which can make the whole project messy from day one. However, with the proper plan, potential pitfalls can usually be avoided.

The same can be said for implementing new construction accounting software. Contractors often hesitate investing in a more efficient system – not because of the cost, but because of the anticipated pain associated with a conversion.

However, many of the errors can be avoided when you apply what you know about running a successful and profitable construction project to converting to a new accounting system. Here are some of the most common errors and how to avoid them:

Error #1: Beginning Without a Plan

Make a PlanApproach this conversion the same way you would approach a construction job – with a solid plan – and tap into the resources of your software provider to develop a logical implementation strategy. They’ve helped hundreds of other clients before you, so allow them to be your trusted partner throughout this process.

Error #2: Not Defining Success

Success is more than simply having the system up and running. Look deeper. What procedures aren’t working with your current accounting software and how can those be improved? Is there too much time wasted in duplicate efforts? Do you want work-in-progress (WIP) reports at the ready? Identify those tangible measurements of success at the onset of this conversion.

Error #3: No Project Manager Assigned

You wouldn’t begin a new job without a project manager (PM) so don’t start a software transition without one. Dedicate a person from your firm as the PM and request a point-person from the accounting software provider, too. Ultimately, those two will be the ones to champion this changeover from start to finish.

Error #4: Doing It the Way It’s Always Been Done

The reason for converting to new accounting software is to increase productivity and profitability, so it is important to review old procedures and make adjustments. Spend the time up front to establish a more standardized and logical coding structure for your jobs, chart of accounts, customers and so forth. Setting up a master job cost code structure, for instance, will allow you to compare data across jobs.

Error #5: Migrating Outdated Information

Before migrating your existing data to the new system, review all your records. Eliminate duplicate vendors, evaluate outstanding items, and archive old employee information. Once your data is clean, develop a procedure for how and when to approach this moving forward – so you avoid this scenario in the future.

Error #6: Not Approaching The Transition in Phases

Converting to a new construction accounting system should be approached in phases, just as you would a job. Map out each phase and timeframe. Using this tactic will keep your staff from feeling overwhelmed as you move forward because you are giving them time to learn the basics before adding more complex functionality.

Error #7: Overlooking Ongoing Training

TrainingYour staff will get the best understanding of how to use the new accounting software from experience, and there will probably be some frustration along the way. Don’t stop after the initial training. Instead, allocate funds for ongoing training – say every three months – for that initial year. Not only will this trouble-shoot any issues, but as your team’s familiarity of the system increases, ongoing training will increase their knowledge base and overall efficiency. Over time, this will enable them to utilize the software to its maximum ability.

The beginning of anything new is always a bit messy, but change is necessary for growth. When you set expectations early on and approach implementation with a solid strategy, you’ll avoid common errors, decrease frustration and be on the path to greater profitability and efficiency for your business.

To learn more about ComputerEase construction accounting software, take a tour to see our full-range of capabilities.

6 Ways Construction Jobs Lose Money to Unproductive Labor

Kenwood Town CenterTo appreciate how construction firms can make a greater profit on projects, you first need to recognize that one of the most common way to lose money is with unproductive labor. Downtime, overtime and reworking a project will kill profits – and oftentimes, morale.

However, when management and the field work together to reduce costs, you can beat the labor budget and complete the project on time or ahead of schedule. Not only does this make the project more profitable, it also makes everyone proud to be a part of such a successful project.

Here are the six most common ways construction projects get hit by unproductive labor:

1. Sloppy documentation – If a job isn’t well documented and organized, things get missed. Schedules get jammed, materials and equipment aren’t delivered when they are needed, and crews are standing around. All of this results in lost production, unproductive labor – and lost profits.

2. No job schedule – Job schedules change, but you still need a plan to manage the job. The easiest way to lose money on a job is to fly by the seat of your pants and be in reaction mode. Map out the job from start to finish, and then fine-tune the plan in small increments (about once every 2 weeks). This strategy is fluid enough to adjust, yet solid enough to keep the project on schedule.

Construction Site in the Snow3. Weather – You can’t control Mother Nature, but you should be documenting weather-related issues and delays in your daily log. You also need to communicate these hold-ups with others who need to know so the schedule is adjusted accordingly.

4. Miscommunication – In the construction industry, it is important to have good external communications with architects, owners, general contractors and subs, but good communication skills always start internally. If your staff isn’t communicating with each other, mistakes happen. Everyone should understand the common goal of making the projects as profitable as possible and appreciate how their role benefits the overall health of the company.

5. Inaccurate job cost history – A crucial element of developing a solid estimate is knowing production rates and the cost of labor. How much is your fully-burdened labor rate? How many feet of pipe can you run per hour? Don’t guess. You should have access to past history from your job costing report. When you don’t use historical data to estimate, the bid you won can quickly turn into a company loss.

6. Resources not available – The quickest route to unproductive labor is to have guys standing around because equipment or materials aren’t available. To make sure you have the right resources at the job when they’re needed, you need to manage the project with organizational skills, good communication and an accurate job schedule.

So how do construction jobs make money?

By addressing all these common mistakes – which all revolve around having an accurate job costing report. When you have an accurate picture of the job, you know:

  • Work in progress and where your resources are being used compared to where you allocated them.
  • Project costs to calculate if your project is on target with the estimate.
  • Labor analysis to determine if your labor hours are on target with the estimate.
  • Unit productivity so you can see if you are completing the work at the pace you estimated.

When you have solid construction accounting software in place, the ways in which construction jobs lose money become more visible – which means you can adjust and fix any issues quicker. You are more organized, which makes you better equipped to schedule jobs. This leads to better communication and more productive labor. The only thing that job costing still can’t control is the weather.

Find more job costing tips in our webinar, “How to Optimize Your Profits through Job Costing.”

CRMs: Generating More Leads, Sales and Happy Customers for Contractors

HandshakeWho doesn’t want to generate more leads, close more sales and create an environment of happy customers? We all do! Because the life-cycle of any given project can be drawn out over months or years, your goal should be to build solid relationships with your customers. When you keep your customers happy, you can keep projects flowing with repeat business. This is where a CRM comes into play.

What is a CRM?
Customer Relationship Management (CRM) allows you to take charge of customer relationships in an organized way. A CRM is a robust database system that enables businesses to organize and automate sales, marketing, customer service and support processes.

There are many ways to manage customer relationships. An Excel spreadsheet is a very simplistic version of a CRM, and perhaps when you first started your business, this is what you used to track customers through the sales process.

But in today’s complicated and competitive environment, contractors need to be highly tuned into their prospects and customers’ needs to generate more leads, win more jobs and yes, keep them happy.

While many construction executives recognize the power behind a CRM system, it has been difficult to find one that actually fits construction-specific needs. Search for “Construction CRM” on Google, and you’ll get dozens (or more) CRM possibilities. But now there is a better way.

Introducing the ComputerEase CRM Module

CRM for ContractorsConstruction management teams no longer have to try to make off-the-shelf CRM solutions work “well enough” for their needs. We recently introduced the ComputerEase CRM module. This is a fully-integrated CRM system that allows you to track, manage and nurture your prospects from the first contact to when they accept your bid … and beyond.

What is unique to our CRM module is that it combines all the features you would expect from a robust CRM system into our existing construction accounting software package. Since the CRM is part of ComputerEase, the double-entry problem is completely eliminated. Once you secure a job, ComputerEase will move the data from the CRM to the rest of the system, including points of contact and any relevant job information.

ComputerEase gives you a deeper picture of estimating, job costing, work-in-progress and other key information you need to make business decisions with confidence. You can also strategically choose to share some of this data with your customers, so they, too, can plan to complete future projects with more efficiency and profitability. This is value that you can offer that many other contractors wouldn’t think to provide, and over time you become an indispensable partner for future construction projects.

This CRM module is truly designed specifically for what construction firms need to generate more leads, sell more jobs and keep their customers happy. Learn more about the ComputerEase CRM module.